camcorders

Panasonic PV-GS2 Camcorder Review

August 11, 2004
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Testing / Performance

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Panasonic-PV-GS2_front.jpg
The Front ***(6.0)* 

The Panasonic PV-GS2’s front face has a small 22x optical zoom lens, located in the upper left corner of the camera body, with the white balance and remote control sensors located directly beneath, obscured by the standard smooth black plastic cover. Underneath these two sensors, the user will find a port cover, which can be flipped upwards from the base of the camera to reveal the dual purpose A/V out and Headphone port. The port cover seems loose and rickety, and could be easily snapped off the camera body without an extensive amount of effort. To the right of the sensors, the user will discover the labeled and visible stereo-zoom in-camera microphone. On the bottom right side of the Panasonic PV-GS2’s front is a bulky eyelet for the hand strap that horizontally spans the right side of the camcorder’s body.

**The Right Side ***(8.0)*

The right side of the Panasonic PV-GS2 is constructed out of a dull black plastic, textured where the user’s right hand would rest while shooting. The hand strap for the right hand spans the bottom of the camera body, and is adjustable via Velcro for a range of hand thicknesses. This camcorder loads from the top, which is a positive feature for users looking to shoot with a tripod mount. With a top-loading cassette cartridge, the user can change tapes without destroying a camera angle or jostling a shot. The open/eject button is located on the top of the camera body. When slid forward, the cassette cartridge opens outward from the camera.

At the base of the camera body, on the right side, the user will find a more secluded port cover, easy to overlook due to its asinine design placement underneath the hand strap. When finally accessed and opened, the user is able to choose between DV in/out and USB. However, the user would have to remove the hand strap each time in order to use these ports for extended periods of time without getting irritated. This becomes aggravating, and could have been easily avoided with better design consideration, as most camcorder users need to access these two ports frequently. Besides the constant maneuvering of the hand strap, the port cover feels cheap, like the one placed on the front face of the camcorder body, and is attached to the camera body via a single rubber hinge which does not appear to be made for long term use or rough handling.

Our editors review and recommend products to help you buy the stuff you need. If you make a purchase by clicking one of our links, we may earn a small share of the revenue. Our picks and opinions are independent from any business incentives.

Sections

  1. Testing / Performance
  2. Physical Tour
  3. Components
  4. Design / Layout
  5. Modes
  6. Control Options
  7. Image Parameters
  8. Connectivity / Extras
  9. Overall Impressions
  10. Conclusion
Our editors review and recommend products to help you buy the stuff you need. If you make a purchase by clicking one of our links, we may earn a small share of the revenue. Our picks and opinions are independent from any business incentives.
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